Nuclear Culture Source Book Ele CarpenterBook launch

Tuesday 4 April 2017
6:00pm – 8:00pm

The Nuclear Culture Source Book

13/14 Cornwall Terrace, Outer Circle (entrance facing Regent's Park), London NW1 4QP

Organised by the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

Edited by Ele Carpenter

Published by Black Dog Publishing

The Nuclear Culture Source Book is a resource and introduction to nuclear culture, one of the most urgent themes within contemporary art and society, charting the ways in which art and philosophy contribute to a cultural understanding of the nuclear. In this talk, Ele Carpenter and Eiko Honda bring together contemporary art and ideas investigating the nuclear Anthropocene, nuclear sites and materiality, along with important questions of radiological inheritance, nuclear modernity and the philosophical concept of radiation as a hyperobject.

This book is the result of four years research into art and nuclear culture by Ele Carpenter as part of a collaboration with Arts Catalyst, which included artistic and curatorial research in Japan supported by the Daiwa Foundation, npo S-Air, Bildmuseet, Arts Council England, and Goldsmiths University of London. The book is published by Black Dog Publishing, Bildmuseet and Arts Catalyst, and is edited by Ele Carpenter.

Contributing Writers

Peter C van Wyck; Gabrielle Hecht; Timothy Morton; Jahnavi Phalkey; Noi Sawaragi; Eiko Honda; Susan Schuppli; Victor Gama; Di McDonald and Nicola Triscott.

Contributing Artists

James Acord; Shuji Akagi; Lise Autogena and Joshua Portway; Erich Berger; Chim↑Pom; Thomson & Craighead; Nick Crowe and Ian Rawlinson; Gair Dunlop; emptyset; Merilyn Fairskye; Nina Fischer and Maroan el Sani; Victor Gama; Joy Garnett; Giuliano Garonzi; Grand Guignol Mirai; Dave Griffiths; Annie Grove-White; Helen Grove-White; Isao Hashimoto; Hilda Hellström; Cornelia Hesse-Honegger; Hollington and Kyprianou; Martin Howse; Pierre Huyghe; Ai Ikeda; Robert Jacobs and Mick Broderick; Miyamoto Katsuhiro; Yoi Kawakubo; Bridget Kennedy; Yves Klein; Erika Kobayashi; Karen Kramer; Sandra Lahire; Jessica Lloyd-Jones; Veronika Lukasova; David Mabb; Cécile Massart; Eva and Franco Mattes; William Morris; Yoshinori Niwa; Takashi Noguchi; Chris Oakley; Uriel Orlow; Trevor Paglen; Yelena Popova; Monica Ross; Susan Schuppli; Taryn Simon; smudge studio; Isabella Streffen; Shimpei Takeda; Nobuaki Takekawa; Kota Takeuchi; Mika Taanila and Jussi Eerola; Robin Tarbet; Suzanne Treister; Alana Tyson; Mark Aerial Waller; Andy Weir; Jane and Louise Wilson; Louise K Wilson; and Ken + Julia Yonetani.

 

About the contributors

portrait ele carpenter

Dr Ele Carpenter

Dr Ele Carpenter is a curator, writer and researcher in politicised art and social networks of making. She is curatorial researcher in Nuclear Culture with The Arts Catalyst, Senior Lecturer in MFA Curating and convenor of the Nuclear Culture Research Group at Goldsmiths, University of London. The research and development stage of the Nuclear Culture project was supported by an AHRC Early Career Research Fellowship, and Arts Council of England. Ele worked with S-AIR in Sapporo to curate the Actinium exhibition, forum and field trips to nuclear sites in Japan. Her current projects includes, ‘Material Nuclear Culture’ at KARST, Plymouth; and ‘Perpetual Uncertainty’ Bildmuseet, Sweden.

portrait eiko honda nuclear culture source book

Eiko Honda

Eiko Honda is a curator and writer in art and transnational intellectual history. She is currently reading for a DPhil in History at the University of Oxford. Her recent papers include ‘On Atomic Subjectivity’ in The Nuclear Culture Source Book and ‘“Planetary” Knowledge? Moving Beyond Internationalism’ in 5: The Anthropocene and Our Post-Natural Future (Tokyo, 2016). Recent exhibitions include ‘Ting-Tong Chang: P’eng’s Journey to the Southern Darkness’, Asia House, London (2016) and ‘Saya Kubota: Material Witness’, Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation, London (2016). She was a fellow of the Overseas Study Programme for Artists, Agency for Cultural Affairs, Government of Japan (2013 – 2016).

Toggle navigation