london craft week urushi 20170504Special event

Thursday 4 May 2017
10:30am – 4:30pm

Traditional Arts and Crafts of Japan: Demonstrations

13/14 Cornwall Terrace, Outer Circle (entrance facing Regent's Park), London NW1 4QP

Organised by the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

Invitation only

Thursday 4 May 2017

10:30-12:30 Urushi Lacquerware

14:30-16:30 Japanese Metal Craft

Admission free

The exceptional skills of Japanese craftsmanship recount the story behind the beautiful traditional craft products they yield. From creative products and contemporary designs for today’s lifestyles, to collaborative projects with the world’s leading product designers as well as fashion, jewellery and auto brands, the Japanese craft industry is renowned throughout the world for the elegance and style of its creations.  In collaboration with Japan’s Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, JAPANPAGE introduces Japan’s finest traditional craft products to the world in order to facilitate new partnerships between Japanese craft makers and creative businesses worldwide.

During London Craft Week, JAPANPAGE will hold two Traditional Craft Product demonstrations at the Daiwa Anglo- Japanese Foundation.  As a representative of the Wajima-nuri tradition of Japanese lacquerware (urushi), Toshiaki Tateno will present the techniques of the atelier Unedaya, which in 2008 was in charge of re-creating a rare replica of the mid-7th century Tamamushi Shrine, a designated National Treasure owned by Horyu-ji Temple in Nara Prefecture. Yoshinori Shimatani from the Shimatani Syouryu-Koubo atelier, specialists in casting traditional orin singing Buddhist Bells/Bowls, will conduct a metal work demonstration to introduce the visitors to suzugami (metallic paper), a beautiful metal sheet which can be folded, bent, and restored to its original form.

About the contributors

Tateno lacquer

Toshiaki Tateno

Toshiaki Tateno, a lacquerware artisan of the Wajima-nuri tradition, was raised in a craftsman family. After graduation, he decided that he wanted to devote his life to Makie, wishing to use this technique to draw his favourite pictures. He is designated as a Japanese Traditional Craftsman by the Japanese Government.

 

 

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Yoshinori Shimatani

Yoshinori Shimatani was born into a long-established metal-working family in Takaoka, Toyama Prefecture. Shimatani is one of ten Buddhist Bell artisans in Japan and he is designated as a Japanese Traditional Craftsman by the Japanese Government.

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