Daiwa Adrian Prizes for Scientific Collaboration

Daiwa Adrian Prizes for Scientific Collaboration

Daiwa Adrian Prizes are awarded in recognition of significant scientific collaboration between British and Japanese research teams in the field of pure or applied science. Fields covered include physics, chemistry, mathematics, computer science, engineering, agricultural, biological and medical research, the scientific aspects of archaeology, geology and experimental psychology.

The Daiwa Adrian Prizes acknowledge those research teams who have combined excellence in scientific achievement with a long-term contribution to UK-Japan relations.

The Prizes were established in 1992 and subsequently renamed to commemorate Lord Adrian, an eminent scientist and a founding Trustee of the Foundation, at whose initiative the Prizes were established. Since their launch, £445,000 in Prizes has been awarded to 76 teams representing 75 different institutions, including 36 from the UK and 37 from Japan – indicating the breadth and diversity of scientific achievement by scientists in the two countries.

The Fact Sheet below contains information about the Daiwa Adrian Prizes including previous recipients.

Daiwa Adrian Prizes Fact Sheet

Daiwa Adrian Prizes 2013

The Foundation makes prizes available in recognition of significant scientific collaboration between Japanese and British research teams every three years.

The deadline for Daiwa Adrian Prizes 2013 was  7 June 2013.  We had an excellent response to our call for applications, with 43 received from teams across the UK and Japan. The 2013 Daiwa Adrian Prizes were awarded at a ceremony at the Royal Society on 27 November 2013.

Four UK-Japan scientific research teams each received £10,000 in prize money. The four Prizes have been awarded across a wide range of disciplines reflecting the diverse range of scientific cooperation that exists between the UK and Japan. We hope that the awards will also encourage those embarking upon UK– Japan scientific projects to maintain and extend their cooperation to produce similarly fruitful and prestigious collaborations.

We extend our congratulations to the team leaders: Professor Tony James (University of Bath), Professor Seiji Shinkai (Kyushu University), Dr Antony Dodd (University of Bristol), Dr Mitsumasa Hanaoka (Chiba University),  Professor Alexander Shluger (University College London),  Professor Hideo Hosono (Tokyo Institute of Technology), Professor Takeshi Nakagawa (University of Newcastle) and Professor Hiroyuki Kitagawa (Nagoya University).

The ceremony was attended by Trustees of the Foundation including Sir Peter Williams (our current Chairman), who is also former Vice President of the Royal Society. Guests included Ambassador of Japan, His Excellency Mr Keiichi Hayashi,  members of the winning teams and other distinguished scientists. The Prizes were presented by Lady Adrian, whose husband, the late Lord Adrian, a former Trustee of the Foundation, initiated the Prizes in 1992.

Listed below are the winners of the 2013 Daiwa Adrian Prizes.

£10,000 Prizes

Chemonostics: Using chemical receptors in the development of simple diagnostic devices for age-related diseases.

Institutions: University of Bath, University of Birmingham, Kyushu University, Tokyo Metropolitan University and University of Kitakyushu. 
UK Team Leader: Professor Tony James, University of Bath
Japan Team Leader: Professor Seiji Shinkai, Kyushu University

“We hope that the success of our Japan-UK project will encourage others to also embark on such productive, insightful and rewarding collaborations. We see the award of a Daiwa Adrian Prize as the pinnacle of our present collaborative efforts and anticipate the profile and prestige of the award will cement our journey forwards to delivering important healthcare devices that could change the world.” Professor Shinkai

Circadian regulation of photosynthesis: discovering mechanisms that connect the circadian clock with photosynthesis in chloroplasts in order to understand how circadian and environmental signals optimise photosynthesis and plant productivity.

Institutions: University of Bristol, University of Edinburgh, Chiba University and Tokyo Institute of Technology.
UK Team Leader: Dr Anthony Dodd, University of Bristol
Japan Team Leader: Dr Mitsumasa Hanaoka, Chiba University

“It is my great pleasure that we have received the Daiwa-Adrian Prize with my collaborative partner, Dr Antony Dodd. This award will enable us to further develop the relationship between our two research groups in the UK and Japan.” Dr Hanaoka

Exploration of active functionality in abundant oxide materials utilising unique nanostructure: discovering novel properties in traditional materials and addressing the limited availability of technologically important elements through curiosity-driven research.

Institutions: University College London and Tokyo Institute of Technology
UK Team Leader: Professor Alexander Shluger, University College London
Japan Team Leader: Professor Hideo Hosono, Tokyo Institute of Technology

“On behalf of Dr Peter Sushku and myself I would like to thank the Lady Adrian, Sir Peter Williams, Mr Jason James and the Royal Society for this prestigious and generous award acknowledging our long-standing and fruitful collaboration with the colleagues from Tokyo Institute of Technology.

One of the main results of this research and collaboration has been that it facilitated the development and friendship of young researchers in the UK and Japan, which has been recognised by this award. They will carry on this collaboration long after this project. We would like to thank again the Daiwa Foundation for recognizing the potential of this collaboration.” Professor Shluger

Extension of terrestrial radiocarbon age calibration curve using annually laminated sediment core from Lake Suigetsu, Japan – establishing a reliable calibration for radiocarbon dates thus considerably improving the accuracy of the age determination.

Institutions: University of Newcastle, University of Oxford, NERC Radiocarbon Facility, Aberystwyth University, Nagoya University, Chiba University of Commerce, Osaka City University and University of Tokyo 
UK Team Leader: Professor Takeshi Nakagawa, University of Newcastle
Japan Team Leader: Professor Hiroyuki Kitagawa, Nagoya University 

“I am deeply honored to have been selected as the recipient of the Daiwa Adrian Prize, today you are present at the moment my dream of developing the radiocarbon dating method has come true. I want to express my gratitude to all my colleagues, to friends and to my family, who always support me in all my undertakings. I am very pleased to have received this award. Thank for your choice and for your trust in us.” Professor Kitagawa

“I am naturally feeling very honoured to be here, representing the UK team of the Anglo-Japanese collaboration on “Extension of terrestrial radiocarbon calibration curve using annually laminated sediment core from Lake Suigetsu Japan”. Thank you very much indeed for choosing us as this year’s recipient of the Daiwa Adrian prize.” Professor Nakagawa

 

Daiwa Adrian Prizes 2010

The 2010 Daiwa Adrian Prizes were awarded at a ceremony at the Royal Society on 2 December 2010.

The ceremony was attended by Trustees of the Foundation including the former Chairman, Sir John Whitehead, and Sir Peter Williams (our current Chairman), who is also Vice President of the Royal Society. Guests included members of the winning teams and other distinguished scientists. The Prizes were presented by Lady Adrian, whose husband, the late Lord Adrian, a former Trustee of the Foundation, initiated the Prizes in 1992.

Listed below are the winners of the 2010 Daiwa Adrian Prizes.

£10,000 Prizes

The evolutionary and spatial dynamics of human viral pathogens. Investigation of the spread of human viruses, particularly HIV and Hepatitis C, why outbreaks begin at certain times and in certain locations, and why virus strains follow particular routes when they disseminate internationally.

Institutions: University of Oxford and the National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo
UK Team Leader: Dr Oliver Pybus, University of Oxford
Japan Team Leader: Dr Yutaka Takebe, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo

“In addition to being a very great honour, the award will enable us to sustain our scientific collaboration in the future.” (Dr Pybus)

“On behalf of my research team in Japan and my colleagues in Asia, I would like to express our sincere thanks to all of you. This unexpected prize is a great honour and encouragement for us.

We plan to extend our study on the genesis of the AIDS epidemic in Asia, and we wish to study other important viral pathogens of great public health importance in the regions, particularly the hepatitis C virus and influenza, as mentioned by Dr Pybus.

Thank you very much for your kind attention. Thank you again for your kind support and great encouragement.” (Dr Takebe)

Photonic quantum information science and technology. Development of new technologies based on harnessing quantum mechanics – the fundamental physics theory governing behaviour at the microscopic scale.

Institutions: University of Bristol, Hokkaido University and Osaka University.
UK Team Leader: Professor Jeremy O’Brien, University of Bristol
Japan Team Leader: Professor Shigeki Takeuchi, Hokkaido University and Osaka University

“It is my great pleasure that we receive the Daiwa Adrian Prize from Lady Adrian today. I would like to express my sincere thanks to all the people who took part in this awarding.

I would also like to use this opportunity to thank the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation for their kind support previously for our collaboration in 2006…we had already started a series of experiments in Hokkaido University. However, for us, how to cover the travel expenses was a big problem. In this sense, the support from Daiwa Anglo-Japanese foundation played a crucial role for our fruitful collaboration.

Thank you very much again for such an excellent award to our collaboration. When you have any chance, please visit us in Hokkaido, or Osaka where now our group is temporarily located.” (Professor Takeuchi)

Non-linear cosmological perturbations. Providing theoretical predictions from the very early universe physics for the statistical properties of primordial curvature perturbations.

Institutions: University of Portsmouth and Kyoto University
UK Team Leader: Professor David Wands, University of Portsmouth
Japan Team Leader: Professor Misao Sasaki, Kyoto University

“It is an honour and a pleasure to be here today to receive this award from Lady Adrian and the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation. Indeed given the unexpected amount of snow on the way here today, I am pleased to be here at all!

This award will support the ongoing collaboration between researchers in Portsmouth and Kyoto to understand the non-linear evolution of density and pressure waves in the universe – in effect, cosmic sound waves.” (Professor Wands)

“Today I am extremely happy and honoured to receive the Daiwa Adrian Prize. This award will certainly strengthen our collaboration even more than before.” (Professor Sasaki)

Nonlinear dynamics of cortical neurons and gamma oscillations – from cell to network models. Advancement of knowledge of the basic operation of brain networks, contributing to understanding of disorders such as schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease and epilepsy.

Institutions: University of Cambridge, Harvard University, Karolinska Institutet, University of Tokyo and Osaka University
UK Team Leader: Dr Hugh Robinson, University of Cambridge
Japan Team Leader: Professor Kazuyuki Aihara, University of Tokyo

“Receiving this Prize is truly a great pleasure, and a great honour. It has been a real team effort, and I thank all of the members of our collaboration – those with us today, and those who were not able to be here. The support that we have received from the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation has been absolutely key to the success of our research.

This award is also particularly significant to me, because of the connection of the prize with Lord Adrian, who was a great figure in my department, the Department of Physiology – now Physiology, Development and Neuroscience – at the University of Cambridge.” (Dr Robinson)

“We are hoping to get clues to realize Astro Boy’s great powers by studying neurons and neural networks in the brain.” (Professor Aihara)

Use of genomics to understand plant-pathogen interactions. Understanding plant pathogen interactions to enhance knowledge on plant disease control.

Institutions: The Sainsbury Laboratory, Norwich and Iwate Biotechnology Research Center
UK Team Leader: Professor Sophien Kamoun, The Sainsbury Laboratory
Japan Team Leader: Dr Ryohei Terauchi, Iwate Biotechnology Research Center

“I am delighted by this recognition of our long-standing collaboration with the laboratory of Dr Terauchi. The collaboration has been extremely productive both at the technical and intellectual levels.” (Professor Kamoun)

“This “Daiwa Adrian Prize” provides a strong impetus to enhance our joint research on the control of devastating disease of rice.” (Dr Terauchi)

Phase space analysis of partial differential equations. Analysis of a range of properties exhibited by solutions to evolution partial differential equations which are of major importance in many different sciences.

Institutions: Imperial College London, Nagoya University, Tokai University, Yamaguchi University and Osaka University
UK Team Leader: Professor Michael Ruzhanksy, Imperial College London
Japan Team Leader: Professor Mitsuru Sugimoto, Nagoya University

“We would like to thank the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation for recognising our work that we have been doing over the last decade. Receiving the Daiwa Adrian Prize is a great honour for all members of our teams, and we will use this support to further our research on the phase space analysis of evolution partial differential equations.” (Professor Ruzhanksy)

“We are very honoured to receive the Daiwa Adrian Prize. As far as I know, our team is the first Mathematician’s group which is awarded such a prestigious prize. ” (Professor Sugimoto)

Photographs courtesy of Yannick Lalardy

Photographs courtesy of Yannick Lalardy