Daiwa Foundation Art Prize

Daiwa Foundation Art Prize

The Daiwa Foundation Art Prize offers a British artist a first solo show at a gallery in Tokyo, Japan. In addition to an exhibition, the winning artist will be given a period of support and introductions to key individuals and organisations in the Japanese contemporary art world.  The winning artist is also awarded a participation fee of £5000.

The triennial prize is open to British artists resident in the UK who have not previously had a solo exhibition in Japan.  Artists applying for the prize are required to submit documentation of four recent works, in any medium (including painting, photography, drawing, sculpture, installation, video etc), a supporting CV and personal statement.  The judging panel select a short list of three artists.  Works by all three of the short list are exhibited at the Daiwa Foundation Japan House Gallery and a winner is announced later that year.

Two Daiwa Foundation Art Prizes have been awarded so far – to Marcus Coates in 2009 and to Haroon Mirza in 2012.

Artists are invited to submit works for the Daiwa Foundation Art Prize 2015

The Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation is delighted to announce the third Daiwa Foundation Art Prize, which offers a British artist a first solo show at a gallery in Tokyo, Japan. In addition, the winning artist is awarded a participation fee of £5000, and a period of support and introductions to key individuals and organisations in the Japanese contemporary art world.

The judging panel is:

Hideki Aoyama, Gallery Director, Aoyama | Meguro Gallery, Tokyo

Richard Deacon, artist

Mami Kataoka, Chief Curator, Mori Art Museum, Tokyo

Chris Orr RA, artist

Jonathan Watkins, Director of Ikon Gallery, Birmingham

The triennial prize is open to British artists resident in the UK who have not previously had a solo exhibition in Japan. The judging panel will first select a shortlist of three artists whose works will be exhibited at the Daiwa Foundation Japan House Gallery, London in June 2015, during which time a winner is announced.

The two previous Daiwa Foundation Art Prizes were awarded to Marcus Coates in 2009, who had a solo exhibition at Tomio Koyama Gallery, Tokyo, and to Haroon Mirza in 2012, whose solo show was held at SCAI THE BATHHOUSE, Tokyo in early 2013. The 2015 Daiwa Foundation Art Prize winner will be invited to exhibit at the Aoyama | Meguro Gallery in Tokyo.

Deadline for applications: 30 September 2014

Artists applying for the prize are required to submit documentation of four recent works, in any medium (including painting, photography, drawing, sculpture, installation, video etc), a supporting CV and personal statement. Entry is free. Applications are made online.

For further information and to apply please visit: www.parkerharris.co.uk

For any queries please contact the project coordinators, Parker Harris:

T. 01372 462190

E. dfap@parkerharris.co.uk

Key Dates:

30 September 2014: Closing date for applications

25 October 2014: Shortlisted artists announced

June 2015: Short-listed exhibition at the Daiwa Foundation Japan House Gallery, London

Autumn/winter 2015: Winner’s exhibition at Aoyama | Meguro Gallery, Tokyo

 

Daiwa Foundation Art Prize 2012 Winner - Haroon Mirza

The second Daiwa Foundation Art Prize was awarded to the British artist, Haroon Mirza, whose first solo exhibition in Japan was held at SCAI THE BATHHOUSE in Tokyo in early 2013.

Haroon Mirza, 2012 Daiwa Foundation Art Prize Winner, Solo exhibition at SCAI THE BATHHOUSE in Tokyo (18 January – 23 February 2013)

Haroon Mirza, Falling rope, 2013, installation view in SCAI THE BATHHOUSE dimensions variable – LED, LED controllers, LCD monitor,speakers, media player, cables
Photo by Nobutada OMOTE | SANDWICH, Courtesy of theartist and SCAI THE BATHHOUSE

We were delighted to present this solo exhibition by Haroon Mirza at SCAI THE BATHHOUSE in Tokyo, Japan. As the winner of the Daiwa Foundation Art Prize 2012, Mirza was given the opportunity to have this exhibition in Tokyo. Partnerships have been central to the successful realisation of the Art Prize and we are very grateful to Masami Shiraishi, President of SCAI THE BATHHOUSE, for agreeing to host this exhibition. I am confident that Mirza’s work will resonate strongly with Japanese audiences, and I hope also that his experiences in Japan will offer new inspirations for his artistic practice.

The Daiwa Foundation Art Prize aims to open doors in Japan for British artists. From over 700 initial applications, Haroon Mirza, Tom Hammick and Jennifer E. Price were shortlisted by our expert panel of judges – Jonathan Watkins, Mami Kataoka, Masami Shiraishi, Martin Gayford and Grayson Perry. Work by the short-listed artists was shown at the Daiwa Foundation Japan House Gallery in London in June and July 2012.

The Trustees of the Foundation join me in offering congratulations to Haroon Mirza. We hope that, in awarding the Daiwa Foundation Art Prize and holding this exhibition at SCAI THE BATHHOUSE, we will not only open new doors for British artists in Japan but also create valuable partnerships and opportunities for the future.

Jason James, Director General, Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

Art and Music and Haroon Mirza

“I was brought up Muslim … In certain regimes [in Islam] music is sort of frowned upon and related to things like infidelity and other terrible things if you listen to or engage with music”                                                                 

By Haroon Mirza

Haroon Mirza’s commitment to sound, to music in particular, is an intelligent challenge not only to the dogma of organized religion, but also to the institution of art. In Mirza’s work, music counteracts the religious tendencies in art, challenging the faith required to persist with the notion that art is somehow transcendent and distinct from everyday life.

Our ears, unlike our eyes, do not have lids. Waves of sound break through. Music is irresistible, undeniable, leaking in to affect us, insinuating, and pervasive. As a constant factor in the aesthetic equations devised by Haroon Mirza, music subtly contradicts the notion of a self-contained work of art, beautiful and true in itself. Our response to music stems from association, from the countless ideas and emotions we bring to our encounter with it, which can also be said of visual art.

Found objects, readymade and often ready-used, likewise occur in Mirza’s work as signs of free thinking, a philosophical scepticism that is, frankly, one of the only redeeming features of art. He knows, as we know, that the final artistic destinations of found objects were never envisaged by their makers, and so it becomes clear that this business of art is a question both of (our imaginative) projection and co-option. This applies as much to found objects that are works of art in their own right, and sounds that are music. All is revealed as being wonderfully unfixed.

Haroon Mirza was brought up Muslim. We were all brought up within some kind of prescriptive structure – be it ideological, religious and/or political – which insists that certain thoughts, tastes and behaviours are simply not acceptable. Art can be like that too, negative and dull. Haroon Mirza’s work, on the other hand, is life-affirming and positive.

Jonathan Watkins, Director Ikon Gallery

Haroon Mirza – Winner of the 2012 Daiwa Foundation Art Prize

Haroon Mirza gained an MA in Fine Art at Chelsea Collegeof Art & Design with a Lynda Brockbank Scholarship (2007). He was awarded the Northern Art Prize 2010 and the Silver Lion for most promising young artist at the 54th Venice Biennale, 2011. He has participated in notable exhibitions including The British Art Show 7 (2011) organised by Hayward Touring, Preoccupied Waveforms (2012) at the New Museum in New York, and the ninth Gwangju Biennale in Korea.

Through his work, Mirza attempts to isolate the perceptual distinctions between noise, sound and music. He explores the potentiality for the visual and the acoustic to come together as one singular aesthetic form. These ideas are examined through lo-fi yet complex assemblages and installations that employ furniture, household electronics, video and existing artworks to formulate audio compositions with a temporal basis.

Daiwa Foundation Art Prize 2012 – Winner Announced

The Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation is delighted to announce Haroon Mirza as the winner of the Daiwa Foundation Art Prize 2012. The Prize offers a unique opportunity for a British artist to gain exposure to Japan’s visual arts sector. Mirza has been invited to hold a solo exhibition at SCAI THE BATHHOUSE in Tokyo in January/February 2013. In addition, he received a £5,000 participation fee plus travel and accommodation costs for a period in Japan to coincide with the opening of the exhibition.

Mirza was awarded the Northern Art Prize in 2010 and held a solo exhibition at London’s prestigious Lisson Gallery in 2011. His work attempts to isolate the perceptual distinctions between noise, sound and music and explore the possibility of the visual and acoustic as one singular aesthetic form. These ideas are examined through lo-fi yet complex assemblages and installations that employ furniture, household electronics, video and existing artworks to formulate temporally based audio compositions. (Haroon Mirza’s website.)

Haroon Mirza, ‘Frame for a Painting’, Installation View (above)

The Prize was presented at a private awards ceremony by the distinguished panel of judges: Jonathan Watkins, Director of Ikon Gallery, Birmingham; Mami Kataoka, Chief Curator at the Mori Art Museum, Tokyo; Masami Shiraishi, President, SCAI THE BATHHOUSE, Tokyo; Martin Gayford, art critic and author; and Grayson Perry, artist and 2003 Turner Prize winner.

Jason James, Director General of The Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation comments: ‘We hope that, in awarding the Daiwa Foundation Art Prize, we will not only open new doors for British artists in Japan but create valuable partnerships and opportunities for the future.

This, the second Daiwa Foundation Art Prize,  saw over 700 artists submit work for consideration. The inaugural winner, Marcus Coates, was awarded the Prize of a solo exhibition at the Tomio Koyama Gallery in Tokyo. An exhibition of work by the three shortlisted artists, Tom HammickHaroon Mirza and Jennifer E. Price was on display at Daiwa Foundation Japan House from 8 June to 19 July 2012. (Exhibition information.)

Please click here for the full press release.

The 2012 Shortlisted Artists:

Jennifer E. Price studied Printmaking at the University for the Creative Arts (2009) and has exhibited in solo and group exhibitions, most recently at the Hatton Gallery, Newcastle upon Tyne, as part of International Print Biennale’s 2011 Print Awards. She lives and works in Kent. In her artwork Price harnesses basic and traditional printmaking methods, and then stands them on their head, resulting in cross boundaries of printmaking, drawing, sculpture, site-based installation, and public intervention. The work addresses complex layers of material culture and the role of the visual artist in a complicated age of media. (Artist’s website.)

Tom Hammick studied MA Printmaking at Camberwell College of Art (1990). He has exhibited internationally in group and solo exhibitions including recent solo shows at Flowers Gallery, London, The Eagle Gallery, London, and Gallery Page and Strange, Canada (all 2011). He is a Senior Lecturer in Fine Art, Painting and Print at the University of Brighton. He lives in East Sussex. Although Hammick’s work references the real world, it is largely concerned with a sense of metaphorical journeying. His paintings and prints are often developed from observed drawings, but during the process of making the work these sources undergo significant transformations. (Artist’s website.)

Haroon Mirza studied MA Fine Art at Chelsea College of Art & Design (2007). He was awarded the Northern Art Prize in 2010, and in 2011 has had a solo exhibition at the Lisson Gallery, London and participated in group exhibitions including Illuminations at the 54th Venice Biennale, Sum Parts at ACME Project Space, London and The British Art Show 7 at The Hayward Gallery, London. In his work, Mirza attempts to isolate the perceptual distinctions between noise, sound and music and explore the possibility of the visual and acoustic as one singular aesthetic form. These ideas are examined through lo-fi yet complex assemblages and installations that employ furniture, household electronics, video and existing artworks to formulate temporally based audio compositions. (Artist’s website.)

For more information on the 2012 Daiwa Foundation Art Prize please visit Parker Harris.

Daiwa Foundation Art Prize 2009 Winner - Marcus Coates

Marcus Coates ‘The Plover’s Wing’ 2008, film (above)

The inaugural Daiwa Foundation Art Prize was awarded to the British artist, Marcus Coates, whose first solo exhibition in Japan was held at Tomio Koyama Gallery in Tokyo in November 2009.

The Prize-winner, Marcus Coates, exhibited the multi-screen video installation, Dawn Chorus, and the DVD, Intelligent Design. During his one-month stay in Japan, he was based at Tokyo Wondersite, took part in launch events at Tomio Koyama Gallery and at the British Embassy, and staged a performance at Roppongi Academy Hills.

“Winning the prize was fantastic, but spending time in Tokyo, exhibiting, performing and researching has proved to be invaluable. My immersion in Japanese culture and history has brought new and unforeseen influences to my work and the contacts I made through the Foundation have created opportunities in Japan. I will be returning to Tokyo later this year to exhibit and perform at the Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo.” Marcus Coates, winner of the Daiwa Foundation Art Prize.

Coates’ film, installation and performance art focuses on the relationship between humans and other species. His work has received international acclaim, having exhibited extensively worldwide and shown as part of the ‘Altermodern’ Tate Triennial at Tate Britain.

The prize was a resounding success, with nearly 900 applicants from across the UK. The prize, as well as providing a unique opportunity for artists wanting to establish themselves overseas, helps to further consolidate Anglo-Japanese relations in the arts. The short listed artists, which include Adam Dant and Bedwyr Williams, exhibited their work at the Daiwa Foundation Japan House Gallery in London from 15th June until 17th July.

The 2009 Judging Panel

Jonathan Watkins (Chair), Director of Ikon Gallery, Birmingham.

Mami Kataoka: International curator who works with both The Hayward Gallery, London and Mori Art Museum, Tokyo.

Tomio Koyama: Owner of Tomio Koyama Gallery and collector of major Japanese and international artists.

Joanna Pitman: Art Critic for The Times and former Times correspondent in Japan.

Edmund de Waal: Artist potter, curator, writer and Professor of Ceramics at the University of Westminster.

‘Coates has emerged as an artist with a distinct and extraordinary vision. He is making work now which is better than ever.’ (Jonathan Watkins, judging panel 2009)

Jennifer E. Price, Soixante neuf, 2009/10

Jennifer E. Price, Soixante neuf, 2009/10

Tom Hammick, Blindout, 2011

Tom Hammick, Blindout, 2011

Haroon Mirza, The national apavilion of then and now, 2011

Haroon Mirza, The national apavilion of then and now, 2011

Haroon Mirza, Digital Switchover, 2012, installation view of |||| ||, Kunst Halle Sankt Gallen, 2012, Courtesy of the artist and SCAI THE BATHHOUSE photo by Gunner Meier

Haroon Mirza, Digital Switchover, 2012, installation view of |||| ||, Kunst Halle Sankt Gallen, 2012, Courtesy of the artist and SCAI THE BATHHOUSE photo by Gunner Meier